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Welcome to my install & review of the CP-E Exhaust!

This is the box it came in. The packing was extreme. Meaning, it was packed so well, I was impressed. The box is about as tall as me.


Once unpacked this is what you got!

The instructions that come with the setup are great, and easy to follow. So, I am stickler for safety, especially since I needed to be under the entire car for a extended period of time. I bought a extra set of jack stands for this. I also jacked the front of the car, with ramps. Remember to use your e-brake, & keep your car in gear so it doesn't decide to roll.

The first thing you need to do [after the car is jacked up and secure] is remove both stabilizer bars under the chassis. The instructions call this step optional, I would say it is a requirement. Just for ease. I also removed the one near the resonator. It makes it easier to get the old pipe out.


You don't have to take it off fully, just enough to swing it out the way.

This is the flange. I would recommend spraying this with WD-40 before you remove the stabilizer bar. It definitely made it easier to get the bolts to free up.

This next step is ONLY IF YOU HAVE CP-E's down-pipe installed.

I would also spray WD-40 on the clamp and on the pipe reducer. I couldn't get the 2.5" adapter off until I sprayed it with WD-40. Then it slid off.




Next is cutting! This can be as painless as you make it. I decided that a metal blade, and a sawzall would be my method. Safty glasses, and gloves would be recommended.


When the instructions say, cut as close to the bend as possible. They mean it.
Next, see the hangar? Do a little pop off action, and that comes off easily. This just require a bit of strength.

Oh look, the exhaust is falling! Remember how I said to take the center stabilizer bar out? It just makes it easier to remove the piping when you are on the floor with jack stands. See the black thing on the top right side..

I found a little trick to help [if you don't have a helper]. Use a jack stand to hold the first 2 sections up! :) And put the center stabilizer back on to help support.

We are almost ready to put the rear section in



CP-E!



Here is one of the silencers


with the tips installed.

Pick-a-boo!

You really do have a huge amount of flexibility with the tips. This in my opinion is one thing that makes this exhaust unique from others.


 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Review

This is my first exhaust install, and I call this a cake walk compared to the RMM. It might be because I am more confident in my skills than before, but this was easy to do. I had all the tools, and nothing snagged me up. So if you are worried about your first time, or easy of install, don't be.

The instructions are easy to follow and well documented.

The materials, and quality of the welds were noticeable. You are paying for quality materials, quality engineering, and quality fabrication. If you did not know this, but every cp-e product comes with a life time warranty. I mean there is not much that can go wrong with an exhaust, but if ever, you know that you have that guarantee is there. This is a huge reason why I like cp-e, and continue stick with them on hard parts. Plus they are a small business, and I've gotten to know the cp-e crew [great bunch].

I first got to hear and drive their prototype exhaust in December, since that time I wanted to get this exhaust on the car. Simply because


  • The sound of the exhaust. It sounds right, and its not too loud when driving normal. It doesn't sound ricey at all.
  • Because I had the 3 inch down-pipe, and I knew that the exhaust was bottling things up.
  • Turbo spooling sound is very cool sounding.
  • Throttle response. Maybe its because I've gotten used to the feel of the car, but as soon as I test drove my car [after install] I could feel immediately that there was a increase in performance. I can still feel it, and it feels good.
  • the drone is low at freeway speeds. Its best at 80MPH. I can talk on my phone, and still hear.
  • This thing can get loud when pushing the car. I like this because when there is a A-hole on the freeway, you can smoke them with your fast car, and make a point with the sound of the car going past them. :D
Any questions you have I can answer.

Videos


 
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Thanks for the info and videos Chad. Can hardly wait to get mine installed.
 

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Did you angle your tips downward? Looks a bit droopy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Awesome dude! Really considering spending the $$ and getting this vs just a muffler delete..hard choices!

Is it just me or do the tips extend past the rear bumper quite a bit??
Its the angle of the picture taken.

Over head view here:

 
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Was the cutting just required to get the stock exhaust out?
You can drop the rear suspension to get the stock piping out. No, not required, but does make it faster.
 

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looks good! sounds great too. Just can't believe the box is that big, haha. You weren't kidding. Now I know why shipping was crazy
 

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I'm not an audio guy, but you asked why your camera's mic doesn't capture the true loudness - because it has Automatic Gain Control. When volume gets close to the threshold of it's response, it quickly compresses the frequencies and brings the volume down to some preset amount below clipping (call it +20db, probably -4db. Then it lets go. At the same time it's boosting the level of any frequencies that are below some other threshold (say -24db below baseline). When the mic has saved that dynamics transition from clipping off and distorting it lets go and allows the volume to rise. If it goes back up too high, and it sucks it down again. It's handy when you're recording in the real world where sudden loud noises happen, usually briefly. It keeps your recording from just sounding batshitty.

If the particular offensive sound is constant, you'll get that muffled sound because it just keeps adjusting it. If there are slight variations to the loud sound's volume, or if the software/hardware for the mic is just cheap, you get these whooshes in dynamics known as 'pumping.' Also most consumer camera mics boost the low up, drop the high down, let them all live close to each other so they aren't damaged by sudden changes. It's called compression.

You lose dynamic range which normally allows your ears to distinguish between background noise, and something loud in the foreground. Compression is good if you want to keep a narrator's voice strong and present over background. You even out the peaks/valleys which allows you to raise the overall level of the voice without introducing distortion.

My one suggestion is to tell viewers that the video clip doesn't have any significant changes from the particular thing you're demonstrating. Otherwise you watch all 6 minutes of something expecting that because it's so long, there must be some reason appearing soon. Or just cut them down and combine them. You have 2 minutes of what should be one video, stretched over an agonizing 18 minutes in 4 videos. More is not always more. I would like to hear some real hard accelerations from inside and outside. Do you feel it has any substantial drone anywhere below 80mph?
 

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I'm not an audio guy, but you asked why your camera's mic doesn't capture the true loudness - because it has Automatic Gain Control. When volume gets close to the threshold of it's response, it quickly compresses the frequencies and brings the volume down to some preset amount below clipping (call it +20db, probably -4db. Then it lets go. At the same time it's boosting the level of any frequencies that are below some other threshold (say -24db below baseline). When the mic has saved that dynamics transition from clipping off and distorting it lets go and allows the volume to rise. If it goes back up too high, and it sucks it down again. It's handy when you're recording in the real world where sudden loud noises happen, usually briefly. It keeps your recording from just sounding batshitty.

If the particular offensive sound is constant, you'll get that muffled sound because it just keeps adjusting it. If there are slight variations to the loud sound's volume, or if the software/hardware for the mic is just cheap, you get these whooshes in dynamics known as 'pumping.' Also most consumer camera mics boost the low up, drop the high down, let them all live close to each other so they aren't damaged by sudden changes. It's called compression.

You lose dynamic range which normally allows your ears to distinguish between background noise, and something loud in the foreground. Compression is good if you want to keep a narrator's voice strong and present over background. You even out the peaks/valleys which allows you to raise the overall level of the voice without introducing distortion.

My one suggestion is to tell viewers that the video clip doesn't have any significant changes from the particular thing you're demonstrating. Otherwise you watch all 6 minutes of something expecting that because it's so long, there must be some reason appearing soon. Or just cut them down and combine them. You have 2 minutes of what should be one video, stretched over an agonizing 18 minutes in 4 videos. More is not always more. I would like to hear some real hard accelerations from inside and outside. Do you feel it has any substantial drone anywhere below 80mph?


What's really interesting is that I read this whole long thing thinking you were going to tell us how to have perfect sound from a GoPro mic, and in the end you were just complaining that the videos were too long. SMH:S
 

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I'm not an audio guy, but you asked why your camera's mic doesn't capture the true loudness - because it has Automatic Gain Control. When volume gets close to the threshold of it's response, it quickly compresses the frequencies and brings the volume down to some preset amount below clipping (call it +20db, probably -4db. Then it lets go. At the same time it's boosting the level of any frequencies that are below some other threshold (say -24db below baseline). When the mic has saved that dynamics transition from clipping off and distorting it lets go and allows the volume to rise. If it goes back up too high, and it sucks it down again. It's handy when you're recording in the real world where sudden loud noises happen, usually briefly. It keeps your recording from just sounding batshitty.

If the particular offensive sound is constant, you'll get that muffled sound because it just keeps adjusting it. If there are slight variations to the loud sound's volume, or if the software/hardware for the mic is just cheap, you get these whooshes in dynamics known as 'pumping.' Also most consumer camera mics boost the low up, drop the high down, let them all live close to each other so they aren't damaged by sudden changes. It's called compression.
Well explained. Depending on the camera in question, it is possible to disable AGC (I'm a photographer, who dabbles in videography and, as a result, have some experience with audio capture). So, if possible, AGC should be disabled to allow for more accurate capture of the sound.
 

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I can try another run of videos tonight, if the weather holds out. I think I saw something about AGC...
 

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If anyone in the Bay Area has an exhaust system they'd like to capture from an audio perspective, I'd be happy to help. I have a solid recorder and good mics to do so.
 

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Now we need you back on that dyno, to see what the downpipe and exhaust can produce. One thing for certain is your ST is breathing quite a bit easier now.
 

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IF you do more videos can you do one with just the cam sitting on the ground like your first one but actually rev it up aggressively? Didn't really give us a good high RPM rev to hear it, just cold start and idling...
 
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