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What type of fuel are you guys planning on running for best performance? I prefer Ethanol Free 93 Octane, but unfortunately stations that carry pure gasoline are a rare breed here in Nashville. Personally, I think ethanol blended fuels are junk, and I try to avoid them at all costs.
 

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I doubt the ST will be setup for E85 so that won't be an option. Ethanol blended fuels aren't all that bad if, ethanol allows for higher octane to be achieved(E85 for example can be had at over 100 octane) the downside to ethanol is since it is an alcohol it requires more fuel than just straight gasoline.
 

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If I am not mistaken cars designed to burn E85 have all stainless steel fuel lines. High concentrations of ethanol will damage butyl rubber. I currently drive a flex fuel vehicle but 2 previous vehicles (2006 Mustang GT and 2005 Chrysler 300C) were on lists of cars not to use the fuel in at the service station where I buy E85. As a soldier I like buying E85 since only 0.15$ on the dollar goes to the people who fund people who put bombs in the road. I imagine I will have to get over that with the ST.
 

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If I am not mistaken cars designed to burn E85 have all stainless steel fuel lines. High concentrations of ethanol will damage butyl rubber. I currently drive a flex fuel vehicle but 2 previous vehicles (2006 Mustang GT and 2005 Chrysler 300C) were on lists of cars not to use the fuel in at the service station where I buy E85. As a soldier I like buying E85 since only 0.15$ on the dollar goes to the people who fund people who put bombs in the road. I imagine I will have to get over that with the ST.
First off, most of our oil doesn't come from the middle east. Secondly, ethanol doesn't produce as much "bang" per volume as gasoline does. Finally, ethanol is hurting tequila. Mexican farmers who would be growing agave for tequila are instead producing corn. Think of the tequila!
I hate this whole ethanol craze. The EPA has approved E15 in our tanks now, which will damage pre-2001 cars. I wonder what special interest group bough that decision.
 

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I don't think I've ever seen unblended, all gasoline that I've ever seen has some ethanol in it. I wouldn't use E85 though unless the manual specifically states that the ST can run it. I've read that E85 gets worse mileage than standard fuel anyway so the cost benefit is not as great as it looks. I personally plan on running 93 Octane like I do in my Mustang. I try to use gas stations that don't buy oil from the middle east but that's hard to do where I live.
 

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I live in Mass and E10 is all that has been available since the early mid 90's.

I have never had an issue with it either.

Also, the last I heard SEMA had effectively lobbied to stop the roll out of E15.
 

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I don't like it because corn isn't a good choice. And they gloss over how much oil (diesel) is used to grow the corn to make the fuel. Don't get me wrong I'm all for getting off oil. Especially middle east oil. I just dont believe ethanol is the way. Also I'm sure the ST is designed with the blend in mind so we shouldnt have issues from it.
 

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First off, most of our oil doesn't come from the middle east. Secondly, ethanol doesn't produce as much "bang" per volume as gasoline does. Finally, ethanol is hurting tequila. Mexican farmers who would be growing agave for tequila are instead producing corn. Think of the tequila!
I hate this whole ethanol craze. The EPA has approved E15 in our tanks now, which will damage pre-2001 cars. I wonder what special interest group bough that decision.

TRUTH!
The country from which the United States imports the greatest amount of oil is Canada. In recent years, the United States has imported approximately 200 million barrels of crude oil annually from Canada.

Oil imports into the United States from Saudi Arabia come in at second place with about 160 million barrels of crude oil annually from the Kingdom. The United States imports about the same amount of oil from Mexico as it does from Saudi Arabia on an annual basis. Other countries from which the United States imports oil are: Venezuela, Nigeria, Iraq, the United Kingdom, Norway, Angola, Algeria and Colombia.
 

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OH... and here is the STUPID STUPID part: About HALF of the oil that we import from Canada we SOLD TO THEM because of regulatory crap that says our oil is too sulphurous to be refined and used HERE. So we sell it to the Canucks and then they sell it BACK to us!
 

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I would think everyone would be putting in super 93 or 91 (california). Since it is a turbo car and you want the motor happy.
E85 is like race fuel 106 octane.

If we were able to get the ECU tuned on the E85 then everyone will be switching to E85.
The stoichiometric is 9.765:1 compared to gasoline which is 14.64:1, so you can run the fuel extremely lean and add tons of timing.

If we had a flashuploader to switch from a 93 octane/E85 maps it would awesome. This car could probably make
300whp and 320lbft to the wheels!

100+ hp/torque over stock (252 x .82% = 206 whp & 270 x .82 = 221 torque).

Also, you can forget about fuel mileage with E85. It takes 30% more than gas to run. Which coincidently the same difference in Stoichiometric of the two fuels. The only thing you benefit from using that is a cleaner environment.
 

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Adding "tons of timing" is not the answer for more power. You only need enough timing do that maximum cylinder pressure from combustion occurs approximately 20 degrees ATDC. More timing than that and you loose power as you do with not enough.

One of the advantages of direct injection you don't add fuel to the cylinder until its needed and it is very well atomized so detonation is reduced. This allows the engine to come from the factory with a tune that is much closer to the ideal. I will venture to say that there will not be much if any improvement in power with Eco boost engine by adding more timing.
 

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I would think everyone would be putting in super 93 or 91 (california). Since it is a turbo car and you want the motor happy.
E85 is like race fuel 106 octane.

If we were able to get the ECU tuned on the E85 then everyone will be switching to E85.
The stoichiometric is 9.765:1 compared to gasoline which is 14.64:1, so you can run the fuel extremely lean and add tons of timing.

If we had a flashuploader to switch from a 93 octane/E85 maps it would awesome. This car could probably make
300whp and 320lbft to the wheels!

100+ hp/torque over stock (252 x .82% = 206 whp & 270 x .82 = 221 torque).

Also, you can forget about fuel mileage with E85. It takes 30% more than gas to run. Which coincidently the same difference in Stoichiometric of the two fuels. The only thing you benefit from using that is a cleaner environment.
Is the fuel tank, lines and injectors even designed to handle E85? I thought I read somewhere that E85 is corrosive and will eat up non prepared fuel lines ect.

I personally like Shell V-Power 91/93. Second to that is BP 91/93.
 

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I would think everyone would be putting in super 93 or 91 (california). Since it is a turbo car and you want the motor happy.
E85 is like race fuel 106 octane.

If we were able to get the ECU tuned on the E85 then everyone will be switching to E85.
The stoichiometric is 9.765:1 compared to gasoline which is 14.64:1, so you can run the fuel extremely lean and add tons of timing.

If we had a flashuploader to switch from a 93 octane/E85 maps it would awesome. This car could probably make
300whp and 320lbft to the wheels!

100+ hp/torque over stock (252 x .82% = 206 whp & 270 x .82 = 221 torque).

Also, you can forget about fuel mileage with E85. It takes 30% more than gas to run. Which coincidently the same difference in Stoichiometric of the two fuels. The only thing you benefit from using that is a cleaner environment.
Hate to contradict you but you have some bits of information wrong. The stoich numbers are correct but regular gasoline runs leaner than ethanol, the higher the a/f ratio number the leaner it is, so the 9.6xx a/f ratio of ethanol is richer than the 14.7 a/f ratio of gasoline. There is also a reason it takes 30% more ethanol to run than gasoline and that is because it has to run that much richer.
 

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I'm definitely in the minority because I will probably run 87 octane most of the time for regular DD'ing, unless I'm really planning on hammering on it or taking it out on some windy roads then I'll throw in some 93. I'm sure it has a fuel sensor like all other new cars these days that sense the octane and ethanol levels and adjust the fuel and timing table maps accordingly. If Ford says its OK with 87 then its not gonna hurt it, just be down on power a bit.
 

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Feel like I need to clear some things up.

E85 will not damage your fuel system and you don't have to upgrade your lines or anything. That is a myth. It is non corrosive, not to be confused with methanol.

E85 will net you more horsepower if the vehicle is tuned accordingly; and yes this is done by leaning it out and adding more timing.

E85 will not require any replacement of parts. Although in order to use it properly you will need to flow more so that means: Better fuel pump, bigger injectors and an adjustable fuel pressure regulator.

E85 can be used in the ST. Any fuel injected gasoline car will be able to run Ethanol fuels.

If you do plan on running E85, I PROMISE you that if tuned properly you will see a very noticeable gain in power.
 

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E85 ethanol is used in engines modified to accept higher concentrations of ethanol. Such flexible-fuel vehicles (FFV) are designed to run on any mixture of gasoline or ethanol with up to 85% ethanol by volume. There are a few major differences between FFVs and non-FFVs. One is the elimination of bare magnesium, aluminum, and rubber parts in the fuel system. Another is that fuel pumps must be capable of operating with electrically conductive ethanol instead of non-conducting dielectric gasoline fuel. Fuel-injection control systems have a wider range of pulse widths to inject approximately 34% more fuel. Stainless steel fuel lines, sometimes lined with plastic, and stainless-steel fuel tanks in place of terne fuel tanks are used. In some cases, FFVs use acid-neutralizing motor oil. For vehicles with fuel-tank-mounted fuel pumps, additional differences to prevent arcing, as well as flame arrestors positioned in the tank's fill pipe, are also sometimes used.
I would not use E85 unless the manual specifically states that it's safe to use. Also, the fuel economy would be worse than 87 octane so that pretty much rules it out for everyday use for me at least. That and only a small handful of stations in my county even have E85.
 
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