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Sure. You simply mount the engine off 90 degrees and use a different tyranny. there is plenty of room under the 'Stang's hood for this.
10-4 to that; I thought there were more concessions made for transverse mounted engines, that made them less than idea for RWD cars; but if the shoe fits... where it!
 

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Not really concessions but instead changes or revisions that need to be made depending on the application. For example in some engines used in both transverse and longitudinal applications there are changes in the intake and exhaust manifold (which is probably less of an issue on the EcoBoost if Ford continues to use the integral manifold design built into the head) due to the rotation as well as possible changes in accessory drive routing and mounting due to packaging.

The mounts for the powertrain are another area that the manufacturer would have to address with the block casting. If Ford developed a revised block with different mounting bosses/pads they might be able to use the same short-block for both applications, for example drilling and tapping for the mounts as needed depending on what vehicle the engine was going in. Worst case would be a separate block and ancillary components but even then it might be produced on the same production lines, use the same internals, cylinder head and many other shared components to maximize production and cost efficiencies.
 

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Blackbird,

Do you know what type of tech is being used on the Escape AWD; from all the reviews I have read it's a fine handling AWD car? Is it not possible to ST or 'track' the Escape hardware? Not doubting you on this, just trying to educate myself (at your expense LOL). I've worked inside the automotive industry for most of my adult life, but always from the manufacturing side. Your insight is... cool, for lack of a better word. Thanks.
 

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Do you know what type of tech is being used on the Escape AWD; from all the reviews I have read it's a fine handling AWD car? Is it not possible to ST or 'track' the Escape hardware? Not doubting you on this, just trying to educate myself (at your expense LOL). I've worked inside the automotive industry for most of my adult life, but always from the manufacturing side. Your insight is... cool, for lack of a better word. Thanks.
I linked to it in one of the earlier posts but the Escape is using an AWD system based around a JTEKT torque coupling and electronic control module. There are also other AWD driveline components from other suppliers such as the front power transfer (take-off) unit from GKN, the rear driveshaft from IFA-Rotorion for the rear driveshaft, the rear differential module, etc. If you missed the link earlier click here for the SAE article and here for the Japanese JTEKT page on their Intelligent Torque Controlled Couplings (ITCC).

The older JTEKT AWD systems that Ford has been using, such as those in the previous generation Fusion/Milan, Taurus/500, etc. were essentially a traction assistive system vice one biased towards performance. They required front wheel slip before the rear drive engaged and were limited in the amount of torque that could be sent to the rear. The newer ITCC coupling and control module on the 2013 Escape (and likely other Ford models as they're redesigned) is a little more advanced and uses an electro-magnetic engagement of it's wet clutch pack that can transfer a greater amount of torque between the front and rear axles (stated up to 100% but with most systems the effective amount is somewhat less) and can engage the system faster on standing start take-off when the vehicle is on slick surfaces such as ice and the front wheels start to slip on acceleration. Once moving the system can also selectively engage the rear drive to aid in handling and vehicle stability.

That's the biggest issue this basic type of system would have in a performance vehicle. The standard torque couplings (the clutch pack that engages transfer engine torque to the rear axle) are somewhat small and don't have significant cooling capability for extended, severe use. You also have an open differential inside the transaxle for the front wheels and an open differential at the rear of the vehicle behind the torque coupling that can't bias torque from side-to-side. Being able to engage the rear axle can help stability which can in turn aid in handling under certain conditions but the vehicle's stability control system will still need to utilize the braking/ABS system to prevent individual wheel spin due to the open differentials.

You could mimic a more advanced AWD system using software and the ABS/stability control systems similar to how the current front drive Focus ST uses a brake-lock differential for torque vectoring side-to-side but the dynamics likely won't be as good as other AWD systems that use one of or a combination of mechanical limited slip differentials or active clutch-based differentials that can bias torque side-to-side on demand without having to utilize the vehicle's braking system. Those systems (Haldex's XWD for example) have increased capacity for torque transfer and additional cooling capacity in the integrated torque coupling and limited slip rear differential module.

Ford has stated and it makes business sense that the next RS like all other limited production models has to be commercially viable and not lose money. That means pricing it in line with the competition around the world and in a package they can build without investing a lot of money for unique components that will only be utilized on the RS model. JTEKT now owns the Torsen brand of helical gear, automatic torque biasing (ATB) differentials and I'm sure they could produce one for the MMT-6 transaxle as well as an ATB to fit in a rear differential module. They might even be able to fit a larger JTEKT ITCC under the Focus and with some software magic produce a great handling car. There's also a chance Ford could utilize the new generation of BorgWarner Driveline Systems (Haldex) XWD or another similar performance oriented solution.

More likely though if Ford tried to add AWD for an RS model I could see them trying to utilize existing components, open differentials and using ABS/stability control in an attempt to vector/bias torque. Without active torque vectoring you'd end up with a system that is nice for poor traction conditions at the expense of added weight and loss of economy while still understeering at the limit. With the amount of power (torque) an RS model would have, and even more power needed if they built a heavier AWD model, I don't think the current off-the-shelf solutions Ford could piece together would be a good match for the character of the car. And to build a proper system to compete with high-end AWD systems would require an outlay for development costs that they might not be able to recoup.

If they can make something work, great, but I wouldn't hold your breath. The new ST is already fairly heavy and has packed on quite a few pounds and I personally wouldn't mind a lighter RevoKnuckle-based front drive RS with a mechanical limited slip combined with their gained experience in torque vectoring using the braking and stability control system. You're not going to have the ultimate traction of an AWD system but they could still make an excellent handling car out on the road and at the track. The RS models are not just about power and accelerating in a straight line but instead should have a heavy bias towards handling. A properly setup front driver can meet those requirements, still accelerate fairly well, have a little character, save development costs and reduce what we'll pay when it comes time to buy one.
 

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Wow. Seriously impressive knowledge there Eric/Blackbird.

Revoknuckle and Lsd plus a little better breathing and suspension and we are there...
 

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I'm a HUGE AWD fan, but not any system that uses the brakes to employ torque vectoring. For even occasional track use, brakes get overheated enough just slowing the car down. Adding the responsibility of controlling inside tire slip is not a step in the right direction for performance-oriented driving -- which is what the RS should be all about. I'm already seeing the ST suffer from early brake fade at Willow Springs, which is not all that hard on brakes. Just upgrading pads won't be enough for the quicker drivers.

Audi had is pretty much right for years with a Torsen in the center and open diffs front and rear. Only after a huge amount of power is being made, diffs at each axle would need to be looked at (which is what the aftermarket is for). However, I really don't see the need for complicated and heavy electronic differential systems on a cheap hot hatch. They would probably drive the car cost up over $50k, meaning Ford would never sell enough to recoup the development and tooling costs, especially if they had to tweak current off-the-shelf components to make it work.
 

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I really love my driver controlled centre diff on my Scooby sti. I think that is a great awd system.
 

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Don't know but you could pm the owners.
 

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Probably best topic for a new thread, but I'd suspect most owners wouldn't buy back their cars after an accident. If you're looking for individual parts you might keep an eye on car-part.com which is a salvage yard/dismantler interchange that allows you to search the inventory from a large number of yards across the country. If you're looking to buy a complete totaled car your best bet would be to look for any local insurance salvage auction companies that may be in your region like Copart, IAA, etc. as some states allow individuals to purchase certain salvage or total loss vehicles without a dealer or rebuilder's license.
 

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I don't even think they need 350...300 and AWD is the key. Spinning tires eats dollars...I want usable horsepower. I've driven the new Shelby...all you do is blow the tires...not usable through the gears, but top end is INSANE.
 

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That article has alot of OLD info in it.

2.3EB will be the motor, shared with the Mustang global. I am not commenting on the rest. ;)
 

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Take this with a grain of salt, but I spent some time talking with a (drunk) Ford senior engineer about my ST, and he commented that the RS was coming, but the big difference is he said it was AWD.

Again, grain of salt, everything I've seen online says Revo FWD, we shall see
 

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Take this with a grain of salt, but I spent some time talking with a (drunk) Ford senior engineer about my ST, and he commented that the RS was coming, but the big difference is he said it was AWD.

Again, grain of salt, everything I've seen online says Revo FWD, we shall see
its coming... Just where at and when???? :LOL:
 
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