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How does this affect vibration versus the lower engine mount?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Chad will answer best.

We run this same bushing in the Chevy Cobalt turbocharged. You will not notice much of any vibs after around 500-1000 miles of use/break in.

Smoother shifting, reduced/eliminated wheel hop, better throttle response, are a few benefits of this mount.

Oh also! Install is easy! Takes about 15 minutes. Comes with color step by step install guide.
 

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Thanks, I tried the rear mount and I guess my old age (37:) couldn't handle the vibration, I wonder if this is better or worse.
 

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Or you could send me one lol

Can't wait to find out
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks!

As members place there orders, if you don't mind post here with your selected color setup.

That way we can associate a member to their mount :)
 

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It's going to be difficult to choose a base and upper support color without actually seeing it. Any chance we can see maybe perhaps a sample of each base color?
 

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Thanks, I tried the rear mount and I guess my old age (37:) couldn't handle the vibration, I wonder if this is better or worse.
I won't be able to tell you that until next week.

With any mount the vibrations are higher than what you have ever felt on the car before. I can say that it does get better. I don't have enough time on the mount to give a fair opinion about the vibs.

Great work Aaron.
 
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That's puuuuuuurdy!! I have the JBR 80a RMM with about 350-400 miles on it, and I experience A LOT of wheel hop. How do you think the car would feel if I had the JBR RMM mount, as well as this upper mount?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That's puuuuuuurdy!! I have the JBR 80a RMM with about 350-400 miles on it, and I experience A LOT of wheel hop. How do you think the car would feel if I had the JBR RMM mount, as well as this upper mount?
Stopping engine/tranny flop with firmer mount is the best way to control wheel hop. More firm you can hold it, the better. I will do a write up soon, on why this is true and what causes wheel hop. We have been manufacturing engine/transmission mounts for 10+ years
 

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Stopping engine/tranny flop with firmer mount is the best way to control wheel hop. More firm you can hold it, the better. I will do a write up soon, on why this is true and what causes wheel hop. We have been manufacturing engine/transmission mounts for 10+ years
Good, then maybe I will just keep the JBR mount and pick this one up as well.
 

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Here is our another similar product, for color selection assistance:

Turbo Tech Racing Solid Upper Engine Mount Chevy Cobalt/Redline/HHR 2.0/2.2/2.4L Manual Trans

As we produce these, we will constantly update our site with more photos.
Thanks, that helps. But I'm having a hard time distinguishing silver metallic and gunmetal.

Is this gunmetal?



Is this polished?



Is this silver metallic?



Obviously this is blue metallic?



And this is black?



So haven't seen flat black and red?
 
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That gunmetal looks nice. I wonder what color would look good with my Oxford White?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Polished (powder coated with special powder to give a polished/chrome effect):
http://www.turbotechracing.com/productcart/pc/catalog/ttr1_866_detail_1032_detail.jpg

Silver metalic:
http://www.turbotechracing.com/productcart/pc/catalog/ttr5_297_detail.jpg

Blue metalic:
http://www.turbotechracing.com/productcart/pc/catalog/ttr3_1277_detail.jpg

Black (which is a smooth gloss black):
http://www.turbotechracing.com/productcart/pc/catalog/ttr4_225_detail.jpg


Gun metal is not shown, it looks like the "polished" above, with a black tint to it.

Flat black is a dull black, no gloss. Great color for a "factory/sleeper look"

Red is a bright smooth gloss red.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Energy-Suspension-Motor-Mount-Inserts-Explained.jpg

Motor Mounts are best known for their ability to reduce wheel hop and allow high performance vehicles to put more power into propelling the car forward. Many ultra high performance vehicles use solid motor mounts because they allow for very little motor movement. Because the motor is held firmly in place, there is no bouncing of the motor assembly. This allows the entire driveline assembly to maintain a solid geometry, reducing the excess movement caused by the otherwise violent release of power.

What is wheel hop?
Wheel hop is a nasty action whereby the driven wheels of a car voilently shake, vibrate, hop, grab, and/or thump upon acceleration. It's usually quite obvious when your car suffers from this condition, for it sounds and feels like your car fell off a garage lift three times every second. Wheel hop doesn't just feel bad - it's bad for your car, too. For reasons that will be explained below, wheel hop can lead to broken drivetrain parts, including axles and rear differentials on a rear-wheel-drive car, and axles and transmissions on a front-wheel-drive car. If your car wheel hops - get it fixed!

What causes wheel hop?
A lot of people don't know why wheel hop occurs, which often leads to them throwing the incorrect parts at the car in an effort to eliminate the issue. Fortunately understanding (and correcting) wheel hop is not difficult. Here is what happens. When a car accelerates, you can picture the forces involved as something (the ground) pushing the driven wheels of the car forward. Obviously if you push the wheels forward, the car is going to move forward also. However, the wheels are not rigidly fixed to the chassis, so when the ground pushes on the wheels, they move forward a bit in the wheel well. Normally a car's acceleration is so small that this motion is negligible, but when a car accelerates quickly, especially during a launch, the wheels can move forward quite a bit in the wheel wells. As the wheels move forward, significant toe changes occur. Now, everybody knows that a tire can provide the most grip when it is perpendicular to the ground, parallel with the acceleration, and pressurized to provide the optimal contact patch. That being said, if the toe of the driven wheels changes during acceleration, the grip of the tire must be changing. Wheel hop is a result of this change in grip. Here is the sequence of events:

1.) Acceleration begins with good grip.
2.) The wheels move forward, toe changes, and available grip is reduced. Wheelspin occurs.
3.) During wheelspin, acceleration is very small. The wheels move back again, toe changes back, and the tire regains grip.
4.) Acceleration begins again, and the process repeats itself.

This rapid switching between grippy acceleration and wheelspin is wheel hop. My above description of the wheel hop process sounds tame, but the frequency of the grip changes and the magnitude of the forces involved is what makes wheel hop so violent. Race tires can prevent wheel hop since they have more grip (i.e., they don't lose grip even with the toe change), but cars that wheel hop with race tires will do so in a much more violent fashion.

How do I get rid of wheel hop?
Getting rid of wheel hop really isn't difficult. If you can limit the motion of the wheel with respect to the chassis, then the toe changes during acceleration will be small and the tire will not suddenly lose grip. If the tire does lose grip (common on a high-HP car of course), then it won't suddenly regain grip due to the wheel moving back to it's static position. How do you keep the wheel from moving with respect to the chassis? Well, assuming your car has reasonably rigid suspension arms, then all you need to look at are the suspension bushings! The wheel can move with respect to the chassis because the bushings flex...especially old, stock rubber bushings. Sometimes simply replacing old rubber bushings with new rubber bushings is all that is required. However, on a modified car that posesses more horsepower than the designer's intended, upgrading to stiffer materials like nylon or polyurethane may be required. The ultimate solution is to use rod ends or spherical bearings at every suspension joint, but that is unreasonable unless your car will never again see public roadways. Anyway, by simply upgrading your bushings, the suspension bushings will not flex as much under strong acceleration, the wheel will not move far forward in the wheel well, the toe of the car will not appreciably change, and your tires will not lose grip. Wheel hop will have been eliminated.
 
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