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Director of Web Relations
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So it's like breast implants. Nice, but not real.
 
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The Site Founder
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This car is going to force the others to step up their offerings in their next refreshes.

This can be moved into the News forum. Thanks for posting!

Chad
 

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Did I say I had a problem with implants :LOL:

I think that it's perfectly acceptable. Given all the sound deadening in modern cars, piping in the most desirable aspects of the engines gives enthusiast the mechanical symphony we crave.
 
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It more like telling the half truth. It sounds great outside as well, the inside sound will just be amplified to sound a bit more throaty. More like putting a short ram in a car with less sound deadening.
What I'm curious about, is whether or not this will be easy to work around for future upgrades. I'm sure it won't be too hard to work around, and I certainly can't complain about that sound!
 

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Sorry boys and girl...not into 'falsies' .... it be fibbery to a degree.
I want the inbound air to the turbo to be a free and clear dump pipe to the turbo!
There is nothing inherently fake about selective frequency amplification or deamplification. It is often done in musical instruments to enhance the frequencies you want and reduce the ones you don't.

I also highly doubt it's connected to the exhaust system in any way. I would imagine it just amplifies certain sound frequencies from the engine compartment (air intake pulses...near the air inlet?), similar to how an acoustic guitar would amplify the vibrations of its strings.

Aftermarket exhaust systems also enhance certain engine exhaust frequencies to sound better, are those fake?
 

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What I meant by dump pipe wasnt the same as a down pipe. I meant I want the inlet pipe to the turbo as absolutely clutter free as possible. Better air flow above all.
Now... about the fakery;
The intake acoustical pulses that would normally generate due to the intake valves opening and shutting ( sort of similar to the vibration of the lips against a trumpet mouthpiece) are scrambled by the spinning turbo. Thats why we only hear the whine of the blades..
Ever hear the throaty roar coming from a big V8 on acceleration? THAT is what you are hearing ...standing acoustical waves of pressure not unlike that of a horn instrument. To replicate that with a flutter valve in the intake is fakery.
As to to the sound of exhaust, that too is the sound you hear. However, since the exhaust pulses made by the exhaust valves are of much greater pressure, the pulses (while somewhat scrambled by the turbo ) remain intact enough to make a decent growl.
The sound in the cabin of a vehicle is a mix of interactions. That of the exhaust, muffler, and the volume of the cabin. Other factors such as muffler body composition and thickness, placement in the length of exhaust pipe, diameter of the pipe, harmonic resonance interaction in the muffler and cabin, padding and dampening in the cabin, and all of this versus the frequency or RPM of the engine.

SO, when I say fakery, I meant it as a false vibrato in the intake tract not resulting from the standing wavefronts normally generated .
 

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Dear God someone give this man a degree!
 
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I know right! :thumb:

As for me, I honestly don't mind if it's not exactly a real engine sound. If it works to help rid the ST of the normal annoying four banger drone, I'm all for it.

As an aside, one of my job duties is to first design and then assist in the certification process for our engine packages on our equipment. I take it very personally and will recommend non-approval on any engine warranty claims whenever someone obviously has modified, removed, or replaced with an unapproved part of ANY major component on our engine installation. On the exhaust system for example, a lot of work went in to muffler selection and matching exhaust back pressure (yes you need some!) vs. noise attenuation and adjusting exhaust length, # and sharpness of bends, and pipe size to ensure it keeps our turbo and emissions people happy. The point of all this is as a result I generally do not modify my cars, mostly because engineers in their field usually know what they are doing (unless management/marketing ignores them or forces their hand which sadly happens a lot).
 

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Hang on, folks. I am about to show you your rights as a consumer and it involves...GASP... READING.. and a LOT of it!

I am REALLY glad you wrote that!
Ladies and gentlemen I would like to introduce you to the Magnuson-Moss Act:
And THIS act prevents arbitray silliness that is employed by those that would do so out of pride, power or whatever.

This federal law regulates warranties for the protection of consumers. The essence of this law concerning aftermarket auto parts is that a vehicle manufacturer may not condition a written or implied warranty on the consumers using parts or services which are identified by brand, trade, or corporate name (such as the vehicle makers brand) unless the parts or service are provided free of charge. The law means that the use of an aftermarket part alone is not cause for denying the warranty. However, the law's protection does not extend to aftermarket parts in situations where such parts actually caused the damage being claimed under the warranty. Further, consumers are advised to be aware of any specific terms or conditions stated in the warranty which may result in its being voided. The law states in relevant part:

“No warrantor of a consumer product may condition his written or implied warranty of such product on the consumers using, in connection with such product, any article or service (other than article or service provided without charge under the terms of the warranty) which is identified by brand, trade or corporate name....” (15 U.S.C. 2302©).



Whats this mean? The use of an aftermarket part will not void your warranty. The only time your warranty will be voided is if

1) The manufacturer is providing a replacement part free of cost.
2) The manufacturer or dealer can prove that the aftermarket part or mod caused the failure or damage.

So what happens if you do an airbox mod and your dealer says your voided the warranty?

http://www.sema.org/content/?id=8124

Visit the above link for more information.

The relevant legislation here, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty - Federal Trade Commission Improvement Act of 1975, protects consumers from being wrongfully denied warranty coverage by new car dealers.

The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act states, in part, in Title 15, United States Code, Section 2302, subdivision (c):
No warrantor of a consumer product may condition his written or implied warranty of such product on the consumer's using, in connection with such product, any article or service (other than article or service provided without charge under the terms of the warranty) which is identified by brand, trade, or corporate name; except that the prohibition of this subsection may be waived by the [Federal Trade] Commission if —

(1) the warrantor satisfies the Commission that the warranted product will function properly only if the article or service so identified is used in connection with the warranted product, and

(2) the Commission finds that such a waiver is in the public interest. The Commission shall identify in the Federal Register, and permit public comment on, all applications for waiver of the prohibition of this subsection, and shall publish in the Federal Register its disposition of any such application, including the reasons therefore.

Under this federal statute, a manufacturer who issues a warranty on your motor vehicle is prohibited from requiring you to use a service or maintenance item, unless such item is provided, free of charge, under your warranty or unless the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) waives this prohibition against the manufacturer.

Further, under the act, aftermarket equipment that improves performance does not automatically void a vehicle manufacturer's original warranty, unless the warranty clearly states the addition of aftermarket equipment automatically voids your vehicle's warranty, or if it can be proven that the aftermarket device is the direct cause of the failure.

Specifically, the rules and regulations adopted by the FTC to govern the interpretation and enforcement of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 16 - Commercial Practices, Chapter I - Federal Trade Commission, Subchapter G - Rules, Regulations, Statements and Interpretations under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, Part 700 - Interpretations under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act. Contained within these rules and regulations is Section 700.10, which states:
No warrantor may condition the continued validity of a warranty on the use of only authorized repair service and/or authorized replacement parts for non-warranty service and maintenance. For example, provisions such as, "This warranty is void if service is performed by anyone other than an authorized 'ABC' dealer and all replacement parts must be genuine 'ABC' parts," and the like, are prohibited where the service or parts are not covered by the warranty. These provisions violate the Act in two ways. First, they violate the section 102(c) ban against tying arrangements. Second, such provisions are deceptive under section 110 of the Act, because a warrantor cannot, as a matter of law, avoid liability under a written warranty where a defect is unrelated to the use by a consumer of "unauthorized" articles or service. This does not preclude a warrantor from expressly excluding liability for defects or damage caused by such "unauthorized" articles or service; nor does it preclude the warrantor from denying liability where the warrantor can demonstrate that the defect or damage was so caused.

Under the Magnuson-Moss Act, a dealer must prove, not just vocalize, that aftermarket equipment caused the need for repairs before it can deny warranty coverage. If the dealer cannot prove such a claim — or it proffers a questionable explanation — it is your legal right to demand compliance with the warranty. The Federal Trade Commission administers the Magnuson-Moss Act and monitors compliance with warranty law.

That being said, if you choose to modify your car, and suddenly the fancy new electronic control boxes that you added to your car make it run rough, not start when cold, or buck like a bronco, the dealer can and will charge a diagnostic fee to find out what is wrong with your car. If it turns out that your modifications are the cause of the problem, the dealer has every right not only to charge you for the diagnosis and repair, but to also void the portion of the warranty that has been compromised by the use of those aftermarket parts. Likewise, a dealer may refuse to service your car if it is adorned with aftermarket parts to the extent that its technicians cannot reasonably be expected to diagnose what is wrong with your car. As an example, all cars manufactured after 1994 are equipped with OBDII (On Board Diagnostics II) ports that dealers use to read engine diagnostic codes for everything from an engine vacuum leak to a malfunctioning emissions system. If your chosen modification has compromised the dealer service center's ability to scan for these codes (aftermarket ECUs generally do not support OBDII), then there is a strong probability that the dealer service center will

Deny warranty coverage

Refuse to service the car

Note with your factory field representative for your region/district that your car has been "modified"

There are laws in the world to protect the consumer. Its always a good idea to know and understand them. Always fully read both your warranty manual, and your owners manual of your vehicle.

Otherwise you could be screwed over by your dealer, warranty or not.
 

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That post makes me happy as a consumer! Just saying that every detail of every part of a vehicle is painstakingly selected balancing many factors, and I love balance. Modification of one part, while you are free to do so and no matter how small, will always affects other parts in some fashion.

It makes me glad at work we do not manufacture/sell consumer products, industrial production machinery only.
 

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Let me tell you what I did on MY Charger within the first 1000 miles:

Headers.
Full exhaust system
Debadged dechcromed
Custom programming
Cold Air Intake
Lowered suspension.

I did this on a 43000$ car.



and I will DEFINITELY do it on a 24000$ car.
 
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